Evernote’s privacy policy lets its employees access your notes, with no opt out option – but it’s a bit more complicated than that

If you’re not interested in potentially sharing the content of your notes with Evernote employees, then your only option will be to leave the service, because you can’t opt out. While it appears that this policy has already been in motion for some time now, an upcoming January update to the privacy policy has placed a large spotlight on the issue. more…

Trailer for upcoming Star Wars film viewed 5x more on YouTube than Facebook

Facebook video sharing has been emerging over the past year as a serious competitor to YouTube. Last year, a report showed that more and more Facebook pages were uploading videos directly to the social network itself as opposed to uploading to YouTube and sharing the link. Despite these reports, however, YouTube views are staying strong this holiday season for one of the biggest cultural trends of the year: Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

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Google exec predicts its cloud business will bring in more revenue than ads within 5 years

Google over the past several months has spoken a lot about its ever-growing cloud business. It recently dropped prices across the board for its Cloud Platform, and now one Google executive believes the business will soon grow to outpace revenue brought in by the company’s ad division…

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BlackBerry Priv sales more than just slow, reportedly suffering higher return rate than expected

Blackberry announced its first Android powered smartphone late last year and the phone launched on AT&T shortly thereafter. Other carriers followed, and things looked bright for the Candian firm. There’s no doubt here that the Priv is a solid device, but with a high price tag and features that not everyone actually cares about, it was always going to be a tough sell.

The company estimated that it would push about 850,000 units in Q4 of 2015, but it only sold about 600,000 units in total in that time. It’s tough to say exactly why things fell below expectations, but one anonymous executive from AT&T had a little bit of insight on the topic (via CNET)…

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Reuters study shows that car-makers have more driverless car patents than Google

Given Google’s apparent lead in driverless car technology, you might imagine that the tech giant has notched-up the greatest number of patents in the field, but Reuters says that this isn’t the case. A detailed analysis of patent filings for autonomous car technology shows that car manufacturers are way out ahead, with Google only taking 26th place.

Toyota is, far and away, the global leader in the number of self-driving car patents, the report found. Toyota is followed by Germany’s Robert Bosch GmbH, Japan’s Denso Corp, Korea’s Hyundai Motor Co and General Motors Co. The tech company with the most autonomous-driving patents, Alphabet Inc’s Google, ranks 26th on the list.

Toyota has more than 1,400 patents in the field, twice as many as second-placed Robert Bosch …

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Opinion: HTC’s One M10 needs to be more than a shiny new phone to make up for past mistakes

Back in early 2013, HTC surprised the smartphone world when the original One (codenamed M7) was revealed in all its shiny aluminum unibody glory. It wasn’t just a well-built and incredibly nicely designed phone: it had the invaluable pro of coming at the right time.

Save for Sony, whose Xperia Z lineup was maturing into an interesting — albeit already a tad repetitive — concept, all the major Android manufacturers were struggling to deliver a compelling product that ticked the aesthetics box as well as those regarding functionality.

Samsung, perhaps too focussed on cramming the latest and greatest specs into its devices, was often heavily dispraised for its poor use of plastic, a criticism that would endure for another two years, while LG’s G line of flagship smartphones certainly couldn’t raise a flag of uniqueness either, more or less tumbling in the same mud…

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With the new Nexus line & Android 6.0, Google wants you to talk to your phone more than ever

Google’s long stated vision, if not obsession, is turning your smartphone into the Star Trek computer. A key part of the computer on the Enterprise is that the primary means of interaction is through voice. The entire process mimics more asking a person a question rather than the ‘typing out what you want to know into a search box’ process that has made the Google so well known.

To meet this goal, the company has been continually doing massive research and investments into speech recognition and machine understanding. The latter is Google’s Knowledge Graph, announced in 2012, that understands concepts and their relationships between things.

These massive investments in speech recognition and Knowledge Graph ultimately culminated with Google Now. If ever there was a thing that paralleled the Star Trek computer in real life, it would be Now and its ability to provide verbal responses to verbally-asked questions. Now, Google is pushing the tech even further with Marshmallow and the new Nexus devices… more…

Galaxy S7 speed test indicates Exynos-powered models are faster than Snapdragon versions

Months before the Galaxy S7 was officially announced, rumors surrounding the device predicted that some regions would get a model equipped with Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon processor while other markets received an Exynos-powered version. Those rumors came to pass, and early benchmarks suggested that GPU performance was far better on the Snapdragon models than it was on the Exynos-equipped phones. In contradictory fashion, a couple of new comparison videos suggest those benchmark results were more than a little misleading.

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