Eric Schmidt caught taking pictures with an iPhone, but is that really a big deal?

Eric Schmidt is in South Korea this week to witness Google’s AlphaGo AI system completely destroy the world Go champion at his own game. Sedol lost the first game yesterday, saying then that he was “very surprised”. Today he lost again. “It was a clear loss on my part,” he said. He had predicted before the matchups began that he would win the five-game series 5-0 or 4-1 “at worst.”

But while the Alphabet Executive Chairman is in South Korea to witness the monumental battle, the Korean press (OSEN, in this case) is clearly focusing on something else. As you can see in the pictures below, Schmidt was caught at a press event this week taking pictures with an iPhone…

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Google Pixel 2 XL drop test reveals tougher back than iPhone, but a somewhat fragile display [Video]

After spending hundreds of dollars on your smartphone, you probably want it to last a while before breaking. The Pixel 2 thankfully has a pretty grippy build, but you’re probably going to drop it at some point. If a case isn’t your thing, you’ll want to know how tough the phone is naked. Thankfully, the first drop test has arrived to answer that question.

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Former Google SVP says Android phones ‘years’ behind the iPhone in photography

Former Google senior vice president of Social, Vic Gundotra, has said that Android phones are literally years behind the iPhone when it comes to photography – and it’s Android’s fault.

Gundotra started by praising the quality of the iPhone 7 Plus camera in a Facebook post.

The end of the DSLR for most people has already arrived. I left my professional camera at home and took these shots at dinner with my iPhone 7 using computational photography (portrait mode as Apple calls it). Hard not to call these results (in a restaurant, taken on a mobile phone with no flash) stunning. Great job Apple.

But he went further …

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Samsung’s Galaxy Note 5 beats the iPhone 6s Plus to become America’s most loved phone

There are a number of things that need to be considered when trying to properly evaluate a device. Beyond mere specs and real life performances, for instance, customer satisfaction is indeed an important metric.

For years, Apple has boasted the iPhone as the number one choice for consumers, but as per the last American Customer Satisfaction Index, Samsung seems to have overthrown the Cupertino giant with its own Galaxy Note 5

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Google announces Assistant for iPhone at Google I/O

Update: The Google Assistant for iPhone is now available on the US App Store.

As previously rumored, Google today announced during its I/O developer conference that its Assistant platform is coming to iOS. The virtual assistant will arrive soon as a standalone app for iPhone, initially for users in the US. Previously the Siri competitor was only available through its Allo messaging app and for Android and Google Home devices.

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Opinion: The iPhone SE should pave the way for smaller, better designed Android phones

Yesterday morning, at a relatively low key event without much fanfare and following the almost ritual avalanche of leaked schematics and what have you, Apple officially announced the iPhone SE. With a chassis virtually identical to that of the iPhone 5s – and 5 before it, for that matter – the smaller-sized iPhone came back in all of its four-inch glory, and not without raising eyebrows.

According to the company’s claims, however, about thirty million people bought a 4-inch iPhone last year, amounting to almost 8% of all Apple phones sold. Considering the massive marketing push made to advertise the four bigger-screened iPhones introduced in the past couple of years, that certainly is no small feat, indicating that there indeed still is interest for smaller devices, a market the Cupertino giant would be naive to ignore.

Sure, the much more variegated Android landscape has offered a few notable options in years past, but those were either afterthoughts, less powerful ‘mini’ versions of established flagships, or devices explicitly designed to be sub-par when compared to their siblings. The iPhone SE may lack 3D Touch and newer-generation Touch ID, but the rest of the package is clearly inspired by the iPhone 6s’ spec-sheet, and nothing says that this smaller sibling isn’t here to stay.

And that begs the question of how this is going to impact the Android landscape. Are Android manufacturers going to follow suit the coming years, or instead pray for the SE to be a one hit wonder (or a complete dud) – and thus something less to worry about?

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